Name Your Game

By DesignInAction, February 27, 2017

Grade Level

  • Elementary School

Category

  • Summer Design Institute

Subject Area

  • Arts
  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies
  • Technology

Lesson Time

Six fifty-minute class periods

Introduction

Students and adults alike often caries hidden biases and prejudices with them about other cultures and people. These ideas can play an unconscious role in their acceptance and tolerance of others. This lesson will help students to teach others about the special and unique world they come from in a fun and interactive way.

National Standards

Common Core Learning Standards: ELA: Writing W: 3:2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic, and convey ideas and information clearly. a. Introduce a topic and group related information; include illustrations when useful to aid comprehension. b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details. W: 3:5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. W:3: 6. With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing . W:3:8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources. W: 3:11. Create and present a narrative, art work, or personal response to a particular theme studied. Social Studies: 3.3a: The culture of a group or individual changes or evolves in response to interaction with other cultures or in response to needs 3. 3b: All people have rich cultural heritages and traditions which influence their life and behavior. Culture: Explore and describe similarities and differences in the way individuals, groups, societies and cultures address similar needs and concerns. Recognize the examples of cause and effect in relationships. Identify, explore the use of various sources and resources used in our society to construct and represent images Visual Arts Level II (Grade K-4) Standard 1 Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes related to the visual arts Benchmark 3. Knows how different media (e.g., oil, watercolor, stone, metal), techniques, and processes are used to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories Standard 2. Knows how to use structures (e.g., sensory qualities, organizational principles, expressive features) and functions of art Benchmark 1. Knows the differences among visual characteristics (e.g., color, texture) and purposes of art (e.g., to convey ideas) Benchmark 2. Understands how different compositional, expressive features (e.g., evoking joy, sadness, anger), and organizational principles (e.g., repetition, balance, emphasis, contrast, unity) cause different responses Benchmark 3. Uses visual structures and functions of art to communicate ideas Standard 3: Knows a range of subject matter, symbols, and potential ideas in the visual arts Benchmark 2. Knows how subject matter, symbols, and ideas are used to communicate meaning Standard 5: Understands the characteristics and merits of one's own artwork and the artwork of others Benchmark 3. Understands that specific artworks can elicit different responses Common Core Learning Standards: ELA: Writing W: 3:2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic, and convey ideas and information clearly. a. Introduce a topic and group related information; include illustrations when useful to aid comprehension. b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details. W: 3:5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. W:3: 6. With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing . W:3:8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources. W: 3:11. Create and present a narrative, art work, or personal response to a particular theme studied. Social Studies: 3.3a: The culture of a group or individual changes or evolves in response to interaction with other cultures or in response to needs 3. 3b: All people have rich cultural heritages and traditions which influence their life and behavior. Culture: Explore and describe similarities and differences in the way individuals, groups, societies and cultures address similar needs and concerns. Recognize the examples of cause and effect in relationships. Identify, explore the use of various sources and resources used in our society to construct and represent images Visual Arts Level II (Grade K-4) Standard 1 Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes related to the visual arts Benchmark 3. Knows how different media (e.g., oil, watercolor, stone, metal), techniques, and processes are used to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories Standard 2. Knows how to use structures (e.g., sensory qualities, organizational principles, expressive features) and functions of art Benchmark 1. Knows the differences among visual characteristics (e.g., color, texture) and purposes of art (e.g., to convey ideas) Benchmark 2. Understands how different compositional, expressive features (e.g., evoking joy, sadness, anger), and organizational principles (e.g., repetition, balance, emphasis, contrast, unity) cause different responses Benchmark 3. Uses visual structures and functions of art to communicate ideas Standard 3: Knows a range of subject matter, symbols, and potential ideas in the visual arts Benchmark 2. Knows how subject matter, symbols, and ideas are used to communicate meaning Standard 5: Understands the characteristics and merits of one's own artwork and the artwork of others Benchmark 3. Understands that specific artworks can elicit different responses

Objectives

Students will: • Understand that simple designs can be solutions for many. • Test their design skills by reducing waste, recycling and reusing resources. • Be able to design an interactive game that teaches others about their culture.

Resources

Internet articles Internet Video’s
  • Melting Pot or Salad Bowl  (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekSFhHSbSNw)
  • The American Salad Bowl: Multiculturalism in the U.S. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxp33FF6Y8A)
 

Materials

8 ½” x 11” white paper and colored paper, paper toilet rolls, discarded cardboard box, packaging peanuts, index cards Pencils, pens, markers, colored pencils, pastels, colored chalk, stickers Letters, stamp pads Fabric, gift-wrapping paper, Scissors, tape, glue and glue guns Ribbon, yarn, pipe cleaners Pictures, magazines, real objects other art supplies depending on the students' access

Vocabulary

design method, culture, background, generation, memorabilia, melting pot, salad bowl/mixed salad, metaphor

Procedures

Teacher should send home a brief survey asking parents simple questions about their family heritage, culture and special family traditions. To introduce the lesson students are encouraged to bring in something that has been passed down to them in their family or something that particularly very meaningful. The teacher should also participate and share something passed down or meaningful with their students. These items can include photographs. Small items should be transported in Zip-lock bags. Memorabilia are due on the same day as the surveys. Session 1: Introduce the idea of culture vocabulary words to students. Allow them to brainstorm their previous knowledge and chart responses. Help them to stretch their ideas without correcting. Watch videos. Send home survey and ask students to find a memorabilia at home to bring in to class to share. (This step should be done on a Friday or the last day before home days. Students will need more than one night to consider what is meaningful to them) Session 2 & 3: Collect surveys and allow students to share their memorabilia’s. Students will take turns sharing their memorabilia’s with their small groups while asking each other questions. Next, students can volunteer to present their memorabilia’s to the class or they can also volunteer to share what they found interesting from a classmates presentation from small groups (This step will most likely take more than one class period depending on the class size) Session 4: Have an interactive game at each table to the children to play with all them to just explore. If desired teacher can have a timer for the children to switch table after an allotted amount of time. At after 30 inform students that it’s time to put the games away. Have the students discuss amongst themselves what they felt the game was teaching them. They will present their game and answer to the class Use discussion questions to start guiding students into the design process. Session 5&6: Using the material, children create an interactive game that answers the questions in the survey. Each game must have directions on how to play and a fun title. Once the designs are complete students will have a chance to share their designs and play someone else’s game. Designs will be displayed in the lobby or library. How does your memorabilia connect to your background/culture? What did you find most meaningful about the experience about learning about each other? Why is it important to know about other cultures? How might we teach others about our culture without having to be present? How can we attract other students to want to teach themselves about other students in a fun and interactive way? Session 2&3 will require for the students to question each other, teacher should plan for this through modeling or giving a small lesson on question asking before starting this lesson.   Optional: a few interactive games, e.g. Sorry, The game of Life, directions for a hand game (Slide Baby, Tweet Baby) Connect Four, Battleship

Assessment

Students will give oral and written feedback about each other’s design

Enrichment Extension Activities

As an extension students must include a mathematics component to their designs. They must write about the process of the design, why they created the specific game, and what they learned about themselves during the process. They must also include in their writing what they found was the most important part of the assignment.

Teacher Reflection

The students should be able to complete their projects at home if they are not able to complete their designs in the classroom. Students can work with other of the same background in small groups

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