3-D Generational Design Painting!

By Diane Gronewold, August 6, 2008

Grade Level

  • High School

Category

  • Architecture

Subject Area

  • Arts
  • Science
  • Social Studies
  • Technology

Lesson Time

Ten 85 minute class periods.

Introduction

The lifestyles and traditions of the past and present generations change through the years as new and convenient inventions are created.  This "progress" can make life more efficient, yet many times these conveniences cause our lives to become more complicated. The main motivation for this lesson is for the students to learn some specifics about how the lives of their ancestors (grandparents, etc.)  were different than their lives are now.  What things were commonly used long ago, and what has taken their place?   This will be an interesting research into design history - how our everyday lives are effected by the design and types of items people use.  Beyond that, the feelings and emotions of the different generations will be expressed.  What was daily life really like long ago?  How does it compare to our lifestyles today?  The students' imagination will be sparked by having them design some of the various types of things that could be created for use in the future! What could possibly be invented in the future to make things even better??? They should also keep in mind what today's problems are and how the future can solve some of these issues. After some creative thinking activities, they will communicate a past, present, and future item along with how they affected, and will affect the emotions of the people using them on a 3-dimensional surface with acrylic paint.

National Standards

Anchors for Reading:

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.7

Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.1

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.8

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.9

Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

  Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

Anchor Standards for Writing:

Research to Build and Present Knowledge:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.8

Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.9

Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Range of Writing:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.10

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Anchor standards for Speaking and Listening:

Comprehension and Collaboration:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.1

Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.2

Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.3

Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.4

Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials, as appropriate.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.5

Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.6

Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

 

National Standards for Visual Arts

Conceiving and developing new artistic ideas and work.

Anchor Standard #1. Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.

Anchor Standard #2. Organize and develop artistic ideas and work. Anchor Standard #3. Refine and complete artistic work.

 

Understanding and evaluating how the arts convey meaning.

Anchor Standard #7. Perceive and analyze artistic work.

Anchor Standard #8. Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work. Anchor Standard #9. Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work.

Relating artistic ideas and work with personal meaning and external context.

 

Anchor Standard #10. Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences to make art.

Anchor Standard #11. Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding.      

Objectives

  1. This lesson will engage the students in the following instruction:
    • Use verbal communication with family and relatives to learn about the lifestyles and traditions of their family and ancestors.
    • Use the computer to further research any item they found to have progressed into a more convenient item.
      • Be able to make comparisons between the different generations as to what their particular needs were or are, and how those needs could be met.
      • Imagine what types of things could be created for use in the future to alleviate any problems there are presently.
      • Work together in small groups and use the design process to redesign an object that was traditionally used by their family in the past (or even present) into a product that could be used to better fit their needs in the future.
      • This lesson will provide a wonderful opportunity to learn and experience how working together with other students can broaden your ideas and viewpoints on many things.
      • Understand and utilize the Elements and Principles of Design as they create an even better item for use in the future.
      • Experience the effectiveness of the design process and how it can be used to organize and develop ideas from a 'need' that has surfaced in their lives.
      • Experience planning and creating a sturdy 3-dimensional surface that they can paint on.  We must be able to display the paintings on a wall - so they need to be able to sit "flat" and not rock or roll!
      • Communicate their designed products visually onto their 3-D paintings.
 

Resources

THE DESIGN PROCESS from The Cooper Hewitt's Why Design?catalogue by Anna Slafer and Kevin Cahill:  http://www.cooperhewitt.org/?s=why+design CBC KIDS - HISTORY OF INVENTIONS, A TIMELINE FROM POTTERY TO COMPUTERS http://www.cbc.ca/kids/the-feed/category/science-tech   A - HISTORY OF FAMOUS INVENTIONS: http://www.history.com/topics/inventions HISTORY OF INVENTIONS & DISCOVERIES: http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?historyid=ab23 Students could research how other painters express their cultural heritage by either visiting their local art museum, or researching some of the many art collections available on line.  Here are a few: Paris Web Museum:  Famous Paintings  www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint   Metropolitan Museum of Art: www.metmuseum.org Museum of Modern Art: www.moma.org Art Institute of Chicago: www.artic.edu     Minneapolis Institute of Art:  www.artsmia.org This web site is a great resource for students to learn about a wide variety of cultures their ancestors might have come from: www.everydayculture.com  

Materials

  • Handout describing the 10 step design process listed above in the resources (taken from the book Why Design? by Anna Slafer and Kevin Cahill).
THE DESIGN BRIEF QUESTIONS: 1.  Need / problem: 2.  Client: 3.  People affected, and how this problem affects your life: 4.  Past, present, and future of the problem: 5.  Attitudes that may need to be changed: 6.  Behaviors that may need to be changed: 7.  Conditions affecting situation: 8.  Performance criteria - A successful solution must do the following: (Rank in order of most to least important.) 9.  Minimum acceptable performance criteria:   Computer with internet access
  • Pencil
  • 9" x 12" paper for each student for brainstorming, planning, and thumbnail sketches
  • 18" x 24" paper for each student to create their sample 3-dimensional painting surface
  • 18" x 24" foam core for each student to create their final 3-dimensional painting surface
  • Masking tape
  • Xacto blades and scrap mat board to protect tables
  • Metal rulers
  • Sandpaper to smooth edges
  • Gesso and brushes
  • Acrylic paint and brushes

Vocabulary

The students will learn and or review the following vocabulary: Empathy - Being able to "put yourself in someone else's shoes" to better understand their feelings. Brainstorming - A group problem-solving technique that involves the spontaneous contribution of ideas from all members of the group.Prototype - Creating a visual and actual sample that shows what their new creation (invention) looks like and how it works. Aesthetics - The description and explanation of artistic phenomena and aesthetic experience. Critique - A critical review or discussion to evaluate or better understand the students' ideas and paintings. Elements of Art - The basic components used by the artist when producing works of art.
  • Line
  • Shape
  • Form
  • Color
  • Space
  • Value
  • Texture
Principles of Design - Certain qualities inherent in the choice and arrangement of the Elements of Art in the production of a work of art. Artists "design" their works to varying degrees by controlling and experimenting with the Elements of Art. Visual Movement and Rhythm - The Principle of Design that refers to the repetition of the Elements of Art to produce the look and feel of movement.  It is often achieved through the careful placement of repeated components which invite the viewer's eye to jump rapidly or glide smoothly from one area to the next. Balance - A Principle of Design that refers to the way the Elements of Art are arranged to create a feeling of stability in a work. Balance can be symmetrical, or formal;  or it can be asymmetrical, or informal.  It can also be radial. Proportion - A Principle of Design that refers to the comparative, proper, or harmonious relationship of one part to another or to the whole with respect to size, quantity, or degree. Variety - A Principle of Design that refers to a way of combining the Elements of Art in involved ways to achieve intricate and complex relationships.  An artwork which makes use of many different hues, values, lines, textures, and shapes would reflect the artists' desire for variety. Unity is the Principle which is variety's opposite;  but when there is too little variety, the result is monotony. Emphasis - Any forcefulness that gives importance or dominance tosome feature or features of an artwork.  Emphasized Elements are used to direct and focus attention on the most important parts of a composition - its focal point. Harmony - Harmony refers to a way of combining the Elements of Art to accent their similarities and bind the picture parts into a whole.  It is often achieved through the use of repetition and simplicity. Unity - A composition is unified when the relationships between its parts interact to create a sense that no portion of the composition may be changed without altering the aesthetic integrity and meaning of the artwork. Color Theory: Shade - Darkening a color with black Tone - Adding a color to a color Tint - Adding white to a color Monochromatic:  all the tints, tones, and shades of one color - from very light to very dark Triadic: 3 colors on the color wheel that create a perfect triangle. For example:  red, yellow, blue or green, violet, orange Complementary:  2 colors that are directly opposite each other on the color wheel.  For example:  yellow and violet. Split Complementary:   Any color on the color wheel along with the 2 colors right beside its complement.  For example:  red,                               yellow-green, blue-green. Analogous:  3 colors that are right beside each other on the colorwheel.  For example:  yellow, green, blue. Realistic:  Colors how they typically appear to the human eye.

Procedures

1.  One week prior to this lesson, the students will be given a handout / questionnaire motivating the students to discover how the lifestyles and traditions of the past and present generations have changed through the years as new and convenient inventions are created.  The handout is as follows: LIFESTYLES & TRADITIONS of the PAST, PRESENT, & FUTURE GENERATIONS!!! 1.  How was life different for your grandparents, great grandparents, or earlier ancestors?  ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ 2.  What things were commonly used in past generations?  ______________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ 3.  What kinds of things have taken the place of some of these items - or how have they changed:  ______________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ 4.  What are some things we use today that could be improved upon for future generations?  ___________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ 5.  What were the feeling & emotions of your ancestors as they experienced their daily lives?  _____________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ 6.  Was it a happier time or not?  ___________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ 7.  What changes to the lifestyles of today could make people happier?  ___ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ You will be focusing your painting on 1-3 items that have changed throughout the generations.  The following websites could be used to further research on the information you've gathered above: CBC KIDS - HISTORY OF INVENTIONS, A TIMELINE FROM POTTERY TO COMPUTERS http://www.cbc.ca/kids/general/the-lab/history-of-invention/default.html FAMOUS INVENTIONS - A - HISTORY OF FAMOUS INVENTIONS http://inventors.about.com/od/astartinventions/a/FamousInvention.htm HISTORY OF INVENTIONS & DISCOVERIES http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?historyid=ab23 2.  The first day of the actual lesson the students will bring in the information they've collected and number off 1-6 to create 5 or 6 groups.  Everyone will be given a copy of the 10 step 'Design Process"  (taken from 'Why Design?' by Anna Slafer and Kevin Cahill ). The 10 step 'Why Design' process will now be used as a guide. Discuss and go through each step as follows:   Step 1:  Identify the need for change - Does someone have a problem? Design is one of the ways we meet our needs and satisfy our                 desires.  To begin designing you have to identify what the need is. Step 2:  Investigate the need - Are you solving the right problem? What exactly is the item you are researching used for and what are the problems with it? Step 3:  Establish performance criteria - What defines a successful solution? What could be done to make the necessary improvements? Step 4:  Write the Design Brief - How can stating the problem make it easier to solve?  Each student will fill out the handout in the                         materials section which is a written summary of their informational journey so far.  Think of the 'Design Brief" as a tool to help you                     organize the information you've collected and outline the steps you must take to solve the problem.  Keep in mind that the students need to divide their own personal information into 3 categories: a. item / emotions of the past b. item / emotions of the present c. possible developments / item / emotions of the future. (They must have a minimum of 1-3 things listed under each category.) Step 5:  Generate ideas - How can you expand your thinking?  Go  through the information you've collected, discuss it in your small group.  Each student will take a turn communicating to their group  what their discoveries were.  Brainstorm within the group to generate even more ideas.  Then - incubate these thoughts and ideas - think about the words and images - doodle them - and even put them out of your mind for a while.  Collect actual images that will help your sketching the next day.  Rethink your discoveries the next day - often times even more ideas will come when your mind takes a break from it! Step 6:  Edit and develop ideas - Which ideas have the most potential?  Are your designs interesting to look at?  Are you creating interesting compositions, using visual movement, and the other Elements of Art and Principles of Design? Step 7:  Test ideas - Get feedback from your small groups and other classmates.  Students brainstorm and sketch out ways to visually communicate the past, present, and future items and emotions.  There will be a minimum of 3 sketches for each category.  They then decide on the best sketch / concept for each category.  No words are allowed. A. At this point the 3-dimensional designing part of the painting surface will be demonstrated and created. Students are then given a sheet of18 x 24 paper to create a 3-dimensional surface that they will be able to mount securely on the wall.  They must be able to divide the surfaces into 3sections for the 3 categories they have been working with.  Tell them that this construction will eventually be made out of foam core - so curves or curls would be difficult.  The teacher then demonstrates how to score, bend, and secure pieces of foam core  together.  Review how to safely use an xacto knife.  Show how they can limit their use of tape by notching shapes together.  Students will then create their 3-dimensional surface out of foam core using their paper sculpture as a model and pattern.  Remind the students that when notching - the notch needs to be the width of the foam core. B. Students will then give their foam core relief sculpture 2 coats of gesso, letting it dry between layers. C. Discuss with the students how they can use color schemes to create different moods and emotions in their paintings, such as: Monochromatic:  all the tints, tones, and shades of one color - from very light to very dark Triadic:  3 colors on the color wheel that create a perfect triangle.  For example:  red, yellow, blue or green, violet, orange Complementary:  2 colors that are directly opposite each other on the color wheel.  For example:  yellow and violet. Split Complementary:   Any color on the color wheel along with the 2 colors right beside its complement.  For example:  red, yellow-green, blue-green. Analogous:  3 colors that are right beside each other on the color wheel. For example:  yellow, green, blue. Realistic:  Colors how they typically appear to the human eye. D. Students will then paint their 3 concepts (past, present, & future), onto their relief sculpture (keeping in mind the 3 sections they have                decided on for the 3 categories).  Each category doesn't need to have the same color scheme.  They will use acrylic paints. Step 8:  Communicate solution - How can you explain your discoveries and creations! Each student will then write a 3 paragraph artist statement about their work. Paragraph #1:  How did you use the 'Design Process' in formulating your ideas / concepts? Paragraph #2:  How did you use the Elements and Principles of Design, and color schemes, in your painting? Paragraph #3:  What are you trying to communicate in each of your three categories of past, present, and future? Step 9:  Evaluate your process:  Did you do what you needed to do?  It's time for a critique! Step 10:  Implement the solution(s):  How can your ideas become reality?  Be brave!  Maybe your designs could actually be patented and manufactured!  Check it out! THE DESIGN PROCESS - taken from Why Design? by Anna Slafer and Kevin Cahill: http://www.cooperhewitt.org/?s=why+design Step 1:  Identify the need for change:  Does someone have a problem? Step 2:  Investigate the need:  Are you solving the right problem? Step 3:  Establish performance criteria:  What defines a successful solution? Step 4:  Write the design brief:  How can stating the problem make it                          easier to solve? Step 5:  Generate ideas:  How can you expand your thinking? Step 6:  Edit and develop ideas:  Which ideas have the most potential? Step 7:  Test ideas:  How can feedback improve your solutions? Step 8:  Communicate your proposed solutions(s):  It's show time!  How can you "sell" your ideas? Step 9:  Evaluate your process:  Did you do what you needed to do? Step 10:  Implement the solution(s):  How can your ideas become reality?

Assessment

The project will be worth a possible 100 points: 20 points for ability to differentiate between the past, present, and future categories. 20 points for overall effectiveness and quality of the painting. 20 points for craftsmanship in putting together the relief sculpture. 20 points for the artists' statement. 10 points for creativity and practicality of the newly designed product. 10 points for use of class time.

Enrichment Extension Activities

This lesson makes a direct connection between the subject areas of social studies and history. Their paintings could be shared in any of these classes as it pertains to concepts they are discussing at the time. Photos of the paintings could be implemented into the school art web site. They will be displayed in the school Media Center, with their artist statements, for other classes, students, and teachers to enjoy. Many classes go into the Media Center to work on projects, so connections will be made continuously. Our local public library is always willing to display student work.  I will be in contact with them to get on their display schedule. The students could create a journal to document the design process they are experiencing. This research and visual communication process could be used for a variety of subject matters.  Taking concrete ideas and altering them together in creative ways is an extremely important tool to experience, especially when you combine it with the expression of emotions!

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