Hello My Name is . . . Helvetica

By Emily Gula, August 24, 2008

Grade Level

  • PreK-1

Category

  • Graphic Design

Subject Area

  • Arts
  • Language Arts
  • Mathematics

Lesson Time

Two 30-45 minute periods

Introduction

This is a great beginning of the year activity. I always play various name games to help create a classroom community. This activity combines name recognition with new art and geometric vocabulary. The first lesson provides students with some vocabulary they can use to describe lines. The next day students will practice recognizing their own names as well as identifying the different types of lines that make up the letters in their names.

National Standards

Visual Arts

Standard 2.Knows how to use structures (e.g., sensory qualities, organizational principles, expressive features) and functions of art

1. Knows the differences among visual characteristics (e.g., color, texture) and purposes of art (e.g., to convey ideas)


Language Arts

Standard 5.Uses the general skills and strategies of the reading process

6. Knows some letters of the alphabet, such as those in the student's own name

7. Knows some familiar words in print, such as own first name.


Mathematics

Standard 5.Understands and applies basic and advanced properties of the concepts of geometry

1. Knows basic geometric language for naming shapes (e.g., circle, triangle, square, rectangle)

Objectives

  • Students will be able to identify types of lines: horizontal, vertical, diagonal and curved.
  • Students will be able to identify the types of lines that make up common shapes such as a square, triangle and circle.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of these lines through body movements.
  • Students will be able to recognize their own name and learn the names of their classmates.
  • Students will be able to recognize the lines that make up the letters in their names.

Resources

  • Drawing with Children by Mona Brookes (pg. 60 - The 5 Elements of Shape chart and line explanations - pgs 62-64).
  • Helvetica documentary (Not to be shown in class, but it was the inspiration for this lesson.)
  • Overhead projector and transparencies (not required)
  • LCD Projector or SmartBoard (not required)

 

 

Materials

  • large cut-out shapes (circle, square, triangle)
  • dry erase board or chalkboard
  • dry erase marker or chalk
  • chart paper or transparency with teacher's name printed on it (could also use an LCD or a SmartBoard to display names)
  • page for each student with his or her name printed several times
  • pencils
  • crayons

 

 

Vocabulary

  • line: a narrow or elongated mark
  • horizontal Line: a line that goes from side to side, left to right and right to left
  • vertical line: a line that goes up and down and down and up
  • diagonal line: a line that slants
  • curved line: a line that bends
  • circle: a round shape
  • square: a shape with four equal sides
  • triangle: a three-sided shape

Procedures

 

Day One:

Materials:

  • large cut-out shapes (circle, square, triangle)
  • dry erase board or chalkboard
  • dry erase marker or chalk

 

Note: Lesson would be best taught with all students sitting together on a large carpet space if possible.

Warm-Up Activity

  • Play silent "Simon Says" game: Teacher will model making horizontal, vertical, diagonal, and curved lines with his or her arms (does not mention names of lines yet) and students will copy actions.


Intro to New Material

  • Explain to students that they just made lines with their bodies.
  • Ask students: Does anybody know what a line is? Where do we see lines?
  • Introduce types of lines:

 

         - horizontal line: a line that goes from side to side, left to right and right to left
         - vertical line: a line that goes up and down and down and up
         - diagonal line: a line that slants
         - curved line: a line that bends

  • Have students repeat each definition and "act out" each type of line by moving just their arms or their whole bodies (depending on space available). Teacher will model making the lines with his or her arms and students will copy, this time naming the lines as they do it.


Guided Practice:

  • Show students large cut out shapes and ask them to identify the shapes.
  • Ask students to put their thumbs up if they recognize any of the lines just discussed.
  • Trace parts of the shapes (one side at a time) and then take shapes away.  Ask students to identify the types of lines they see.


Independent Practice:

  • Have students stand up and have them demonstrate each type of line (the teacher will announce each line type one at a time).


Day Two

Materials:

  • teacher's name printed on paper, glued to poster board, or copied onto transparency or viewed through LCD projector or SmartBoard
  • page for each student with name printed several times
  • pencils
  • crayons


Warm-Up:

  • Teacher will name different types of lines and students will act them out on carpet


Introduction to New Material:

  • Show students different examples of lines around the room: on posters, in books, etc.
  • Ask students if they notice any differences in the types of lines they see.
  • Explain that when we print letters they look different and are made up of different lines.
  • If an LCD projector or SmartBoard is available the teacher could show a sampling of different letters.

 

Guided Practice:

  • Show students the teacher's name printed on a piece of printed paper, on an overhead transparency or using a LCD projector or SmartBoard. Make sure the type size is large enough for all students to see. 
  • Ask students to identify similarities and differences they see in the different letters.
  • Have students identify the different types of lines they see.


Independent Practice:

  • Students will be given a piece of paper with their name printed on it several times.
  • Depending on the age of students they could: identify the types of lines they see in their name in a small group setting, trace or circle the different types of lines they see in their name one at a time (could trace the diagonal lines in one printing of name, the horizontal lines on the second printing of name, etc.), or could trace the different types of lines with different colored crayons.

 

 

Assessment

 

Assessment for Day One: 

  • For Pre-K and K students an informal assessment would be best. This could be done through anecdotal notes taken while watching students demonstrate different types of lines on the carpet. A more formal approach would be to individually assess each student on their ability to identify types of lines on a piece of paper or point out the different lines they see.
  • Other options:  If individual dry-erase boards are available each student could draw different types of lines when prompted and hold them up for the teacher to see. Another option (better for older students) would be to give students a worksheet with various shapes and have them highlight the different lines with different colors.


Assessment for Day Tw

 

  • Students could be assessed on how well they can identify the different types of lines that make up the letters in their names.

 

 

Enrichment Extension Activities


  • Students could go on a line hunt around the classroom, at home, or in a magazine.

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