Changing the World: Social Entrepreneurs Part One

By Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, March 11, 2008

Grade Level

  • High School

Category

  • Design for the Other 90%

Subject Area

  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Lesson Time

One fifty-minute class period

Introduction

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum’s Design for the Other 90% exhibition demonstrates how design can be a dynamic force in saving and transforming lives, at home and around the world. Of the world’s total population of 6.5 billion, 5.8 billion people, or 90%, have little or no access to most of the products and services many of us take for granted. In fact, nearly half do not have regular access to food, clean water, or shelter. Design for the Other 90% explores a growing movement among designers to design low-cost solutions for this “other 90%.” In this two-part lesson, students will examine the world of social entrepreneurs and their efforts to create positive change in society.

National Standards

Common Core English Language Arts
College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards
Strand Reading
 
Language Arts - Reading
Language Arts - Writing
Working With Others
Economics
Business Education
Geography

Common Core State Standards:

Anchors for Reading

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.5 Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.6 Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

Anchor Standards for Writing

Text Types and Purposes:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.

Production and Distribution of Writing:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Range of Writing:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Anchor standards for Speaking and Listening

Comprehension and Collaboration:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.2 Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.3 Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Anchor standards for Language:

Conventions of Standard English:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Knowledge of Language:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

 Vocabulary Acquisition and Use:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.6 Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression.

Objectives

Students will:
• investigate the Design for the Other 90% exhibition • conduct internet research • create a graphic organizer • participate in small-group and large-group discussion • work collaboratively in small groups • create a class presentation

Resources

Materials

Computer with internet access

Procedures

Building Background Activity One: Introducing Design for the Other 90%
The purpose of this activity is to introduce students to Cooper-Hewitt’s Design for the Other 90% exhibition. 1. Introduce your students to Cooper-Hewitt's Design for the Other 90%.
2. Provide time for students to browse the different sections of the website. You may also choose to have them complete this task as homework. Lead a class discussion about the exhibition, using the following questions as guidelines:
  • What do you think is the purpose of the exhibition?
  • What surprised you the most?
  • What area interested you the most? Why?
  • What did you learn?
Activity Two: Introducing Social Entrepreneurship
The purpose of this activity is to provide background information on social entrepreneurship.
1. Tell the class that they are going to learn about social entrepreneurship. Write the following quotations on the board: • "Social entrepreneurs identify resources where people only see problems. They view the villagers as the solution, not the passive beneficiary. They begin with the assumption of competence and unleash resources in the communities they're serving." Source: David Bornstein, author of How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas • "Social entrepreneurs are not content just to give a fish or teach how to fish. They will not rest until they have revolutionized the fishing industry." Source: Bill Drayton, CEO, chair and founder of Ashoka 2. Have the students listen to a podcast that tells the story of a social entrepreneur who founded the Global Women’s Leadership Network at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/bigdreamers/2008/07/21/global-womens-leadership-network-whole-woman-whole-leader-whole-world. 3. Read the following information aloud to the class: • A social entrepreneur identifies and solves social problems on a large scale. Just as business entrepreneurs create and transform whole industries, social entrepreneurs act as the change agents for society, seizing opportunities others miss in order to improve systems, invent and disseminate new approaches, and advance sustainable solutions that create social value. Unlike traditional business entrepreneurs, social entrepreneurs primarily seek to generate "social value" rather than profits. And unlike the majority of non-profit organizations, their work is targeted not only towards immediate, small-scale effects, but sweeping, long-term change. Source: http://www.pbs.org/opb/thenewheroes/whatis/ 4. Divide the class into groups of three. Ask each group to create a “Help Wanted” advertisement for a social entrepreneur. Tell the students that they can use the following website as an additional resource http://www.pbs.org/opb/thenewheroes/meet/. When the students are finished, have each group present its advertisement to the entire class.
Steps for Learning Activity One: Social Entrepreneur Graphic Organizer
The purpose of this activity is to provide students with an opportunity to research the world of social entrepreneurship.
1. Divide the class into small groups. Tell the students that they are going to conduct research and construct a graphic organizer. Give each group a copy of the “Graphic Organizer Directions” handout and the “Social Entrepreneurship Graphic Organizer” handout. Review the steps on the handouts with the class prior to beginning.
2. When the students are finished, provide time for each group to present its organizers to the class. Have the students keep the organizers to use in the second part of the lesson.
Follow this lesson with Part Two of the activity.

Enrichment Extension Activities

Differentiation for Middle School

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