Design A UV Ray Protection Covering – Written by Cheryl Palao

By Dana Holden, February 27, 2017

Grade Level

  • PreK-1

Category

  • School Design

Subject Area

  • Science

Lesson Time

6 lessons

Introduction

Students learn about light from the Sun and UV rays. They review how the UV rays can cause damage to the skin and eyes and ways to protect themselves (sunglasses, sunscreen). At the beginning of the lesson, inform students that they will be asked to design a solution to protecting students on a playground from UV rays. Students will be given materials to design a shade to protect students from UV rays. BACKGROUND The students complete a study of the sun. The class discusses the importance of protecting skin and eyes from UV rays. Look for example of coverings that can protect us from UV rays.

National Standards

1-ESS1-1 Use observations of the sun, moon, and stars to describe patterns that can be predicted. 1-ESS1-2 Make observations at different times of year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year. ETS1.A Defining and Delimiting an Engineering Problem – Asking questions, making observations, & gathering information are helpful in thinking about problems. ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions – Designs can be conveyed through drawings, or physical models. ETS1.C – Optimizing the Design Solution – Because there is always more than one possible solution to a problem, it is useful to compare & test designs.

Objectives

The students will design an area to keep students cool in a sunny area. The students will create a covering and test to see if the area will keep UV rays out. Students will design a covering for a playground to protect students from UV rays.

Resources

Project Lead The Way 1st Grade Unit: Light: Observing the Sun, Moon, and Stars. (2014 Project Lead The Way)

Materials

Foil, cardboard, paper, construction Paper, plastic wrap, scissors, glue, UV sensitive beads, pipe cleaners, poster board, PLTW Launch Log or notebook to answer questions and draw designs.

Vocabulary

Design Process - A step by step way to solve problems. Engineer - A person who is trained to solve problems. Engineering - The use of technology, mathematics, and science to solve problems. Light - The form of energy that makes it possible you see things

Procedures

Lesson1: The teacher reads aloud the Light: Observing the Sun, Moon, and Stars introduction. • Students are introduced to the design problem they will solve at the conclusion of the module. • I Do: The teacher reads aloud the Light: Observing the Sun, Moon, and Stars introduction. The teacher leads the discussion about the problems faced by the students. The teacher reviews why shadows form as discussed during the previous module, Light & Sound. • We Do: The teacher leads a class discussion about the problems faced by the students. The teacher guides the students to identify the need to call for help. The learn about the design process and are introduced to the design problem they will face at the conclusion of the module, • You Do: Students examine the amount of daylight during the year. Students color the bar graph showing the amount of daylight. • Students fill in the missing words in their Launch Logs to the following statement: The Sun rises in the morning and sets at night. • Students answer one of the conclusion questions in their Launch Log on Page 2. Checking for understanding: Why do we see the sun? Turn and talk with your partner. What does the sun provide? (Sun provides light, energy, and heat energy.) What is the problem faced by Suzie, Mylo, & Angelina? How might the patterns of the sun that we observed help us solve the problem Angelina, Mylo, & Suzie are facing? Lesson 2: Activity 2 Phases of the Moon • The teacher reads The Sun is My Favorite Star by Frank Asch to the class. • Students complete K-W-L about the moon. • I Do: The teacher The Sun is My Favorite Star by Frank Asch to the class. The teacher guides the students in class discussion about the moon. • We Do: The teacher leads a class discussion about the story & discussion about the moon. The teacher guides the students in creating a diagram to show how the light from the moon following the steps given. • You Do: The students glue or tape their moon, draw a yellow sun and a blue Earth, & show how the light form the sun reflects off the moon to the Earth on Page 3 in their Launch Log. • Students complete the following sentence in their Launch Logs: Light from the Sun reflects off the moon and into our eyes. • Students answer the conclusion question in their Launch Log on Page 4. Checking for understanding: What did you notice about the position of the Sun in the illustrations? Does the Sun really go away? What is the author describing? Turn and talk with your partner. The author states, “Even in the night, it sends some light to keep me company.” What do you think this means? How can we see light from the Sun at night? (The moon reflects the suns light.) Does the moon create its own light? How do you know? How can we see the moon if it does not make its own light? Lesson 3: Activity 3 Patterns of the Stars • The teacher reads the introduction and leads a discussion about stars. • Students complete K-W-L about stars. • I Do: The teacher leads the discussion about stars. • We Do: The class discusses the differences in the sky during the day & night. The students learn how we see stars as the light they generate travels through space. Students observe the patterns of stars, including the trend that stars are able to be observed only at night. Students discuss why the stars are not visible and explore the one star that can be seen in the day (our star the Sun). • You Do: The students draw a picture showing the sky at night in their Launch Log on Page 5. • Students draw a picture showing the sky during the day in their Launch Log on Page 5. • Students answer the conclusion question in their Launch Log on Page 6. Checking for understanding: How would you describe the stars to someone who has never seen them? Have you ever wished upon a star? Turn and talk with your partner. When have you seen stars in the sky? (Answers vary: At night or when it is dark outside) What are stars? Why can you not see stars during the day? Lesson 4: Project 4 Mystery Beads • The teacher reviews the background information about UV rays. • Students complete K-W-L about UV rays. • I Do: The teacher leads the discussion of UV rays, explains how UV rays cannot be seen, there are several types of UV rays, and UV rays contribute to the formation of vitamin D, and can have harmful impacts. The teacher guides students in ways to protect from UV rays. • We Do: Students learn as they experiment and document results of exposing UV-sensitive “mystery” beads to sunlight. Students prepare to solve the design problem for this module. • You Do: Students draw a picture of the mystery bead bracelet & describe how they look when you are I the classroom. The UV rays can be harmful, and why protecting yourself from UV rays are important. • Students observe the mystery beads in the sunlight & describe how they have changed in the sunlight. • Students answer the conclusion question in their Launch Log on Page 8. Checking for understanding: Do you ever wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from the Sun? Do you use sunscreen when you are going outside? Turn and talk with your partner. How did your beads change in sunlight? Why do you think they changed? (They changed colors because of UV rays.) How can you protect your skin from UV rays from the Sun? Lesson 5: Problem 5 Take Cover! • The teacher reminds the students of the design problem is to work in a team to design, create, & evaluate a playground with sheltered area to protect students from UV exposure. • The students review the previous days Launch Logs & review the problem in the story. • I Do: The teacher reviews the steps in the design process and explains the procedures for the design. • We Do: The students follow the design process & answer the following questions in their Launch Logs: • Ask- What is the problem? Page 9 • Explore- How can you try to solve the problem? Page 11 • Model-Draw a picture of your final design. Page 13 • Evaluate- Draw a picture of you & you partner testing the design. • Explain one strength & one weakness of your model. Page. 15 • Explain-Did your model solve the problem? Why or why not? Page 17 • Explain-How would you change your design? How would these changes improve your design? Page 17 • Students complete the Reflections for each step of the design process. Pages 10, 12, 14, 16, & 18 in their Launch Logs. Checking for understanding: Turn and talk with your partner. What are the steps in the design process? (Ask, Explore, Model, Evaluate, and Explain) Ask-What is the problem? Explore-How can you try to solve the problem? (Write or sketch) Talk to your team and share ideas. Circle the one idea you think will work best to solve the problem. Model-Draw or insert a picture of your final design. Evaluate-Draw a picture of you and your partner testing the design. Explain one weakness of your model. Explain-Did your model solve the problem? Why or why not? Explain-How would you change your design? How would these changes improve your design? Describe how your playground solved (or did not solve) the design problem. What other materials could have been used to provide protection from UV rays? How could your school playground be changed to include areas (or more areas) that give students protection from the Sun? Lesson 6: As a whole group, have the class discuss the problems UV rays can have of on the skin. Review the previous design challenges. Review the design process: Ask, Explore, Model, Evaluate, Explain. Ask what the problem is (design a covering for a sunny area to protect skin and eyes.) Have students write or draw the problem. Students discuss their ideas with their group (4-6 students) and decide which of the designs they will use. Test the designs on the playground using their UV sensitive bead bracelets. Discuss or write about if their model was successful. Write about how the design could be changed, Explain how they would improve the design and what other materials they might use to provide more protection. Discuss ways the school playground could use coverings to give students protection from the Sun. What are the steps in the design process? (Ask, Explore, model, Evaluate, and Explain) What is the problem? How can I solve the problem? (Write about or draw a picture of your ideas.) Talk with your group and share your ideas. How would you design an area to keep students cool in a sunny area? Will it protect them from harmful UV rays? How would you change/improve your design? (Write about or draw a picture.) After completing the design challenge, how could our school playground be changed to give more protection from the Sun?

Assessment

Students will take their designs to the playground to test if their design will protect students from UV rays. Students use the UV sensitive bead bracelet to test their designs.

Enrichment Extension Activities

Students could redesign their coverings and test them during another class period. Students can research the topic of protecting skin form UV rays.

Teacher Reflection

The students were excited about planning and discovering ways to solve the problem. They were encouraged to use what they learned from previous Ready, Set, Design Challenges to design the covering. Although most of the designs did not totally block UV rays on the first try, students were able to demonstrate what they learned about the Sun. The next time I use this lesson I will have students walk around the school and ask them to look at home and in their neighborhoods to see what type of coverings are used to give shade from the sun. I would also give them an additional class period to create and test their redesigns.

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